RESUME KEYWORDS GET YOU NOTICED!

Written by Earn a Lot on Sunday, October 11, 2009 at 8:40 AM

Use these Resume Action Words in your resume wherever appropriate to add depth and dimmension to your experiences and accomplishments. Make your personal background stand out from the crowd. Keywords help you to do this in a compelling way.

Attention-getting words like these will get your resume noticed. Why? Employers want employees who will show initiative and do what is needed to get the job done.

RESUME KEYWORDS GET YOU NOTICED!

Accelerated Accomplished Achieved Acquired
Acted
Activated Adapted Addressed Adjusted Administered Advanced Advertised Advised Advocated
Aided Allocated Analyzed Answered Anticipated Applied Appraised Approved Arbitrated Arranged Ascertained Aspired Assembled Assessed Assigned Assisted Attained
Audited Augmented Authored Automated Awarded Balanced
Began
Boosted
Briefed
Budgeted
Built
Calculated
Captured
Catalogued Centralized Changed
Chaired
Charted
Checked
Clarified Classified Coached Collaborated Collected Combined Commanded Communicated Compared Compiled Completed Composed Computed Conceptualized Condensed Conducted Conferred Conserved Consolidated Constructed Consulted Contacted Contained Continued Contracted Contributed Controlled Converted Cooperated Coordinated Correlated Corresponded Counseled Created Critiqued Cultivated Customized
Cut
Debugged Decided Decreased Defined Delegated Delivered Demonstrated Designated Designed Detected Determined Developed Devised Diagnosed Directed Discovered Dispatched Dispensed Displayed Dissected Distinguished Distributed Diversified Documented Doubled
Drafted
Earned
Edited
Educated
Eliminated Emphasized Employed Enabled
Enacted
Encouraged Enforced Engineered Enhanced Enlarged
Enlisted
Ensured
Entertained Established Estimated Evaluated Examined Executed Expanded Expedited Experimented Explained Explored Expressed Extended Extracted Fabricated Facilitated Familiarized Fashioned Finalized
Fixed
Focused
Forecasted Formed Formulated
Fostered
Found
Founded
Fulfilled
Furnished
Gained
Gathered
Generated
Governed
Guided
Handled
Headed
Heightened
Helped
Hired
Honed Hypothesized Identified Illustrated Imagined Implemented Improved Improvised Incorporated Increased Indexed Indoctrinated Influenced Informed Initiated Innovated Inspected Inspired
Installed Instituted Instructed Insured Integrated Interacted Interpreted Interviewed Introduced Invented Investigated Inventoried Involved
Issued
Joined
Judged
Justified
Kept
Launched
Learned
Lectured
Led
Lifted
Located
Logged Maintained Managed Marketed Maximized Measured Mediated
Merged Minimized Mobilized Moderated Modified Monitored Motivated Navigated Negotiated Netted
Observed
Obtained
Opened
Operated Ordered Orchestrated Organized Originated Outlined Overcame Overhauled Oversaw Participated Performed Persuaded Photographed Pinpointed Piloted
Pioneered
Placed
Planned
Predicted Prepared Prescribed Presented Presided Prevented Printed Prioritized Processed Produced
Programmed Projected Promoted Proofread Proposed Protected Proved
Provided Publicized Published Purchased Qualified Questioned Raised
Ran
Rated
Reached
Realized Reasoned Received Recommended Reconciled Recorded Recruited Reduced Referred Regulated Rehabilitated Related Remodeled Rendered Reorganized Repaired Replaced Reported Represented Researched Reshaped Resolved Responded Restored Restructured Retrieved Reversed Reviewed Revised Revitalized Routed
Saved
Scheduled
Screened
Set
Searched Secured Selected Separated Served
Set up
Shaped
Shared
Simplified Simulated Sketched
Sold
Solidified
Solved
Sorted Spearheaded Specialized Specified Sponsored Stabalized Staffed Standardized Started Stimulated Stored Streamlined Strengthened Structured Studied Summarized Supervised Supplied Supplemented Supported Surpassed Surveyed Sustained Synthesized Systematized Tabulated Targeted
Taught
Terminated Tested Tightened Totaled
Tracked
Traded
Trained
Transcribed
Transferred
Transformed
Translated
Transmitted Traveled
Treated
Trimmed
Tutored
Typed
Uncovered Undertook Unified
United
Updated
Upgraded
Used
Utilized
Validated
Verbalized Verified
Vitalized
Volunteered Weighed Widened
Won
Worked
Wrote

RESUME KEYWORDS = RESUME SUCCESS!

Adsense Website topics which help make money online

Written by Earn a Lot on Monday, June 29, 2009 at 9:34 AM







New Page 2




 











Accounting

Acne

Adsense

Advertising

Aerobics

Affiliate

Alternative

Articles

Attraction

Auctions

Audio Streaming

Auto Care

Auto Parts

Auto ResponderS

Aviation






Babies Toddler

Baby

Bankruptcy

Bathroom

Beauty

Bedroom

Blogging

Body Building

Book Marketing

Book Review

Branding

Breast Cancer

Broadband Internet

Business

Business Loan

Business Plan






Cance

Car Buying

Career

Car Insurance

Car Loan

Car Maintenance

Cars

Casino

Cell Phone

Chat

Christmas

Claims

Coaching

Coffee

College University

Computer Tips

Cooking

Cooking Tips

Copywriting

Cosmetics

Craft

Creative Writing

Credit

Credit Cards

Credit Repair

Currency Trading

 


 




Data Recovery

Dating

Debt Relief

Diabetics

Diet

Digital Camera

Diving

Divorce

Domain

Driving Tips






Ebay

Ebook

Ecommerce

Email Marketing

E Marketing

Essay

Ezine

 






Fashion

Finance

Fishing

Fitness

Flu

Furniture

 






Gambling

Golf

Google

GPS

 






Hair

Hair Loss

HDTV

Health Insurance

Heart Disease

Hobbies

Holiday

Home Business

Home Improvement

Home Organization






Interior Design

Internet Tips

Investment


 






Jewelry






Kitchen

 






Ladies Accessories

Lawyer

LCD / PLASMA

Legal

Life Insurance

Lingerie

Love


 




Mailing List

Make Money

Mortgage

MP3

Music

 






Network Marketing


 






Online Shopping






Paid Survey

PC Games

Perfume

Personal Injury

Pay Per Click

Pregnancy

Publishing


 






Real Estate

Recipe

Recreation

Relationship

Resume

Romance

RSS


 






Sales Letter

Self Employment

SEO

Shoes

Small Business

Smoking

Software

Spam

Sports

Spyware

Stress


 






Trading

Travel


 






Vacation Rental

Video Conferencing

Video Streaming

Virus

VOIP

Web Design

Web Development

Web Hosting

Website Traffic

Wedding

Weight Loss

Wine

Women

Writing Tips

 






Commonly asked questions to the student at Addmission Interview

Written by Earn a Lot on Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 6:33 PM

Commonly asked questions to the student at Addmission Interview

Tell me something about yourself? (Your strengths/weakness)?
This is the dreaded, classic, open-ended interview question and likely to be among the first. It's your chance to introduce your qualifications, good work habits, etc. Keep it mostly work and career related.


Which adjectives would you use to describe yourself?

What is your aim in life?
What do you want to become in life / what will you do when you grow up?
Learn everything you can about the field you wish to enter: history, recent developments, trends, areas, leaders, problems, etc.


What past accomplishments gave you satisfaction?
Briefly describe one to three work projects that made you proud or earned you pats on the back. Focus more on achievement than reward.

What are your hobbies / interest?

What extra-curricular activities do you participate in?

What do you do in your spare moment?

What are the regular T.V. programs that you watch?

Tell me about your family background?

What experiences have you had in . …

What have you read lately?

What will you do if somebody near to you is very ill?

Why do you want to leave the current school? Why do you want to pursue this particular course? What do you know about this school?
Learn everything about the school you wish to enter: faculty, curriculum, requirements, specialties, uniqueness, history, organization locations, expansion plans, reputation, major achievements, etc. (www.doononline.net)

Ask Questions (Think of questions you would like to ask if given the opportunity during the interview)

First and foremost, you should never be afraid to ask questions (even ones you think might be stupid) during your interview and even in the days leading up to it.

Some programs might even interpret a lack of questions by the applicant as a sign of disinterest, and that's the last vibe you should be giving off. The interview is a two-way street; probe your interviewers for information just as they do the same to you.

Ex.: What would the school timings, how big is the library – how many books and categories of books you have. Do you have Internet facility. What types of sports facility are available, how often can I call home or meet my parents.

Rehearse
Rehearse your answers to commonly asked interview questions. You'll feel more comfortable answering questions during the interview. The more comfortable you are, the more likely that you'll be able to think clearly, and you'll appear controlled and mature (always a good thing!). Rehearse in front of a mirror, so that you can see what your interviewer will. Also, a word of warning: people don't enjoy talking to a robot, complete with pre-programmed answers. It's fine to rehearse, just make sure that during the real thing you don't come across like you're reading from a script.

Finally, if you are confronted with a question that you're not prepared for, there is nothing wrong with asking for a moment to think about your answer. Interviewers will respect you for taking a moment to compose an answer instead of just blurting something out to avoid being silent. It shows that you really want to give the best answer you can instead of just anything that comes to mind.

What Interviewers Look For and Assess:

1. Integrity: ethics, morals, sincerity, honesty, responsibility, dependability, and genuineness.

2. Ability to communicate: nonverbal communication (voice, eye-contact, gestures, posture, nervous mannerisms, handshake, facial expressions), verbal communication (language, grammar, ability to organize and express ideas in answers and questions), and ability to listen.

3. Physical bearing: poise, appearance (neatness, appropriate dress, grooming).

4. Personality and human relations skills: ability to create a favorable first impression, understanding of others, tolerance, empathy, sense of humor, warmth, ability to relate, interest in and desire to help people, compassion, objectivity, tactfulness, open-mindedness, independence, self-reliance.

5. Maturity: appropriate for age, status, and experience; reasons for wanting to be a . . .; understanding of the field and daily work of a . . . ; knowledge of trends, issues, problems, strengths and weaknesses, and developments in the chosen field realistic self-concept.

6. Motivation: strength of desire to enter the field, desire to attend this school, initiative, drive, enthusiasm, perseverance, knowledge of this school.

7. Emotional stability: ability to handle pressure and stress, ability to carry out responsibilities, self-discipline, self-confidence, and mental alertness.

8. Experiences: vocational (vocationally oriented curricular and extra curricular activities in school, work with people in the chosen field), and non-vocational (non-vocationally oriented curricular and extra curricular activities, work experiences, working with people).

9. Knowledge: of current events, of the theories and practical applications of these theories to the chosen field.


(Compiled by Shabbar Suterwala)
Post-Graduate in Psychological Counseling,
Personal Growth Trainer
Contact: 989 222 5864
http://shabbarsutewala.blogspot.com/

MASTERING BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEWS

Written by Earn a Lot on at 6:31 PM

MASTERING BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEWS 
***************************************************************************
 
If you are seeking a job within the competitive hospitality industry, 
you 
need to be aware that employers are frequently turning to the use of 
behavioral interviewing, rather than traditional modes. Employers are 
aware that traditional interviews do not give the desired ability to 
predict a candidate's future job performance. Behavioral interviews are 
4-
5 times more likely to give the employer information about your past 
performance, which is the indicator of your future performance. They 
will 
be asking questions that will probe your past and will be listening 
carefully for you to respond using key words that are a part of their 
predetermined acceptable answers. Are you prepared to compete for the 
position? 
 
What does the buzz phrase "Behavioral Interview" mean? 
 
The term "behavioral interview" can be defined as the type of interview 
which allows employers to gain a keen sense of the type of employee you 
are. Rather than ask you to respond to something specific such as "Name 
three things you enjoyed in your last position", the employer might 
phrase 
it "Tell me about some things that you enjoyed about your last 
position." 
He will be listening for pre-determined keywords and will rate you 
accordingly. 
 
What are universal key words in the hospitality industry? 
 
-Industry Standards: Customer, Satisfaction, Service, Quality, Smile 
-Work Standards: Punctual, Detail, Organized, Decision, Honest, 
Flexible, 
Initiative, Willing 
-Co-worker Standards: Relationship, Teamwork, Multicultural 
-Industry Experience: Professional, Expertise, Result 
 
Depending upon the specific position, you are interviewing for (hotel, 
resort, food service, and restaurant); there will be additional 
keywords 
the employer is looking for. A chef may want to use the 
word "presentation", for example. A room cleaner would want to be sure 
to 
use the word "thorough" during the interview. A front desk manager 
would 
want to use the word "appearance". Develop your list accordingly. 
 
Research will pay big dividends 
 
Whether you are applying for a position in a hotel, resort community, 
or a 
position in food service; it is critical that you do your homework. 
There 
are three easy steps you can take to prepare for the application and 
interview process. 
 
-Research. Do an internet search, visit, or call to gather information. 
It 
will be beneficial to write keywords used in the web content or 
conversation, to use when applying or interviewing. 
 
-Apply. Tailor your resume and cover letter to meet the employer's 
needs. 
Use the information that you have gathered to write an effective 
document 
that will cause the employer to immediately take notice and call you in 
for an interview. 
 
-Interview. Become familiar with behavioral interviews. You can do an 
internet search to obtain lists of potential questions. The key will be 
to 
know the typical formats and have a dozen rehearsed scenarios that you 
can 
tailor to the specific question at the interview. 
 
What format should you use in relating scenarios? 
 
Many employers will be listening for a simple three step response 
format 
to their questions; therefore you will want to frame your responses 
accordingly. The format is knows as Situation-Action-Result (SAR). 
-Situation-the employer wants a concise description of the setting and 
circumstances that you are discussing. 
-Action-the employer wants you to describe what action you took in the 
situation. 
-Result-the employer will be looking for the results. Using keywords 
and 
quantitative, measurable results will be very impressive! 
 
Employers will be listening for how you reacted to the situation, what 
action you took and the results. Be prepared to give at least one 
example 
of what might be perceived as an extremely difficult situation. Prepare 
to 
share about a negative situation that had a positive outcome. 
 
What are the three types of questions in Behavioral Interviews? 
 
-Open questions. These are questions that will allow you to use the SAR 
format and answer in a clear and concise manner. The employer will 
likely 
follow up with additional probing questions, looking for signs that you 
may not have been completely honest. 
-Tell me about a time that you helped someone in need. 
-Give an example of a situation that was uncomfortable for you. 
-Relate an experience you have had as a part of a team. 
 
-Closed questions. These are questions that are asked for the purpose 
of 
verifying something you may have indicated during the application 
process 
or earlier in the interview. The employer is looking for consistency in 
your answers. 
-You attended XYZ Institution, correct? 
-You are able to begin next week, correct? 
-You intend to live in this area for at least another year, correct? 
 
-Why questions. These are questions that require you to give a logical 
and 
decisive explanation for a previous action. The employer is not judging 
your action, but rather your ability to reason, logic and make a 
decision. 
-Why did you choose to apply here? 
-Why have you changed jobs within the hospitality industry three times? 
-Why did you leave your position at XYZ company? 
 
You Are Ready 
 
You have researched the company, located keywords, applied for the job 
prepared a number of scenarios, and rehearsed answers to potential 
questions. You are now ready to go to the Behavioral Interview with 
confidence. 
 

Interview Questions

Written by Earn a Lot on at 6:30 PM

Interview Questions

Sample Interview Questions with Answers

Sample interview questions of the common type are listed below. Answers are included. But perhaps suggestions for tailoring your responses is a better way to put it, since specific answers are impossible to provide. Practice answering these sample interview questions out loud to yourself or ask a friend or relative to help you.

Don't feel that you have to answer right away. Interviewers know that you're nervous and expect you to think a bit, so do think carefully before you answer. But don't hesitate too long or it'll appear that you're stalling. Interviewers will ask open-ended questions to see where you'll go with them, so try not to ramble while you're thinking of a real answer.

Q. Tell me about yourself.
A. This is the dreaded, classic, open-ended interview question and likely to be among the first. It's your chance to introduce your qualifications, good work habits, etc. Keep it mostly work and career related.

Q. Why do you want to leave your current job? (Why did you leave your last job?)
A. Be careful with this. Avoid trashing other employers and making statements like, "I need more money." Instead, make generic statements such as, "It's a career move."

Q. What are your strengths?
A. Point out your positive attributes related to the job.

Q. What are your weaknesses?
A. Everybody has weaknesses, but don't spend too much time on this one and keep it work related. Along with a minor weakness or two, try to point out a couple of weaknesses that the interviewer might see as strengths, such as sometimes being a little too meticulous about the quality of your work. (Avoid saying "I work too hard." It's a predictable, common answer.) For every weakness, offer a strength that compensates for it.

Q. Which adjectives would you use to describe yourself?
A. Answer with positive, work-oriented adjectives, such as conscientious, hard-working, honest and courteous, plus a brief description or example of why each fits you well.

Q. What do you know about our company?
A. To answer this one, research the company before you interview.

Q. Why do you want to work for us?
A. Same as above. Research the company before you interview. Avoid the predictable, such as, "Because it's a great company." Say why you think it's a great company.

Q. Why should I hire you?
A. Point out your positive attributes related to the job, and the good job you've done in the past. Include any compliments you've received from management.

Q. What past accomplishments gave you satisfaction?
A. Briefly describe one to three work projects that made you proud or earned you pats on the back, promotions, raises, etc. Focus more on achievement than reward.

Q. What makes you want to work hard?
A. Naturally, material rewards such as perks, salary and benefits come into play. But again, focus more on achievement and the satisfaction you derive from it.

Q. What type of work environment do you like best?
A. Tailor your answer to the job. For example, if in doing your job you're required to lock the lab doors and work alone, then indicate that you enjoy being a team player when needed, but also enjoy working independently. If you're required to attend regular project planning and status meetings, then indicate that you're a strong team player and like being part of a team.

Q. Why do you want this job?
A. To help you answer this and related questions, study the job ad in advance. But a job ad alone may not be enough, so it's okay to ask questions about the job while you're answering. Say what attracts you to the job. Avoid the obvious and meaningless, such as, "I need a job."

Q. How do you handle pressure and stress?
A. This is sort of a double whammy, because you're likely already stressed from the interview and the interviewer can see if you're handling it well or not. Everybody feels stress, but the degree varies. Saying that you whine to your shrink, kick your dog or slam down a fifth of Jack Daniels are not good answers. Exercising, relaxing with a good book, socializing with friends or turning stress into productive energy are more along the lines of the "correct" answers.

Q. Explain how you overcame a major obstacle.
A. The interviewer is likely looking for a particular example of your problem-solving skills and the pride you show for solving it.

Q. Where do you see yourself five (ten or fifteen) years from now?
A. Explain your career-advancement goals that are in line with the job for which you are interviewing. Your interviewer is likely more interested in how he, she or the company will benefit from you achieving your goals than what you'll get from it, but it goes hand in hand to a large degree. It's not a good idea to tell your potential new boss that you'll be going after his or her job, but it's okay to mention that you'd like to earn a senior or management position.

Q. What qualifies you for this job?
A. Tout your skills, experience, education and other qualifications, especially those that match the job description well. Avoid just regurgitating your resume. Explain why.

Q. Why did you choose your college major?
A. The interviewer is likely fishing to see if you are interested in your field of work or just doing a job to get paid. Explain why you like it. Besides your personal interests, include some rock-solid business reasons that show you have vision and business sense.

Earn from Google Adsense

Written by Earn a Lot on Thursday, August 28, 2008 at 10:28 AM

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Google Adsense Strategy

Written by Earn a Lot on at 10:20 AM

Getting the Maximum out of Google AdSense: Strategy Classification

Google AdSense program has given an altogether new purpose to websites. Besides serving content or selling products and services, websites are now being used to generate revenue through serving Google AdSense Ads. The webmasters employ various strategies in order to extract the maximum out of Google AdSense program. There is no formal classification available for these strategies (nor can all the strategies be determined), however, the following 3 classifications are said to be more prevalent than the others:

1. Traffic Generation: Since the revenue generation from Google AdSense Ads is based on the CPC (cost-per-click) and CPM (cost per thousand impressions) basis, the more traffic your have to your website the better are your chances of getting good revenue through AdSense. Most webmasters are fully aware of this fact and employ various tricks to generate high traffic to their website. All such tricks fall under the category of ‘Traffic Generation’.

2. Converting traffic to Clicks: Clicks seem to be the best way of increasing AdSense revenue. Prompting the website visitors to click on the AdSense Ads can make a big difference in terms of the AdSense revenue that you earn. A good copy can make the website visitors more confident about your website and hence encourage them to go ahead click the AdSense Ads. Besides the website copy, the website owners apply several other means for getting more clicks. These form the ‘Converting traffic to Clicks’ category.

3. Attracting High Value AdSense Ads: Besides the traffic to your website, your AdSense revenue is also based on the value of the AdSense Ads. So, some Ads produce more revenue when they are clicked/displayed than the others. This is determined using the Adwords system. Some webmasters develop websites primarily for AdSense revenue generation. These webmasters choose the website topic and orient the content in such a way so as to attract high value AdSense Ads. These tricks form the “Attracting High Value AdSense Ads” category.

About the author

This is the area where you will put in information about who you are, your experience blogging, and what your blog is about. You aren't limited, however, to just putting a biography. You can put whatever you please.